Building Future Champions – Pre-Event Details

Ian Jeffreys

Ian Jeffreys – Building Future Champions

We are hope you are looking forward to this event as much as we are!

It promises to be a phenomenal experience working up close and personal with Ian as he brings a vast amount of experience from years of training junior athletes.

Please arrive for 9.15am with the start scheduled for 9.30am

Schedule for the day:

9.15am – Welcome & Introduction
9.30-10.15am – The Need for LTAD
10.15-10.30am – Break
10.30-12noon – The Future Champions system – a flexible objectives based approach to developing the modern athlete
12.00-12.45pm – Lunch
12.45-1.15pm – Developing Effective Future Champions sessions
1.15-2.15pm – Developing Effective GameForce
2.15-3.30pm – Developing Effective Gamespeed
3.30-3.45pm – Break
3.45-4.30pm – Developing Effective Game-metabolism
4.30-5.00pm – Putting it all together

How to find us

By Car

St. Peter’s High School is on Stroud Road, Gloucester, GL4 0DD

Address: Sports Pavilion, St. Peter’s High School, Stroud Road, Gloucester GL4 0DD.

 

On Arrival at St. Peter’s:

Upon driving into the main car park, drive towards the main steps and follow the road around to the right. Follow the side road down to the bottom car park and park near the tennis courts. The Sports Pavilion is visible behind the tennis courts, use the glass fronted entrance and we will be registering upstairs in the Pavilion suite.

By Train

The nearest train station is Gloucester – please see www.nationalrail.co.uk for train times.

Should you have any issues on the day then please contact James Baker on 07730608188

Food & Drink

We will provide light refreshments in the form of water & fruit with Tea & Coffee available over lunchtime as well.

Lunch is not provided, so please be prepared and bring your own lunch.

There is an Esso garage & Co-op nearby should you need to go and pick up lunch during the breaks.

Mobile Phones

Please note attendees are not permitted to either film video footage or record audio from any of the sessions with the workshops. Anyone who is found doing so will be asked to leave the event.

If you have any questions between now and the event or any issues on the day please either contact James Baker on 07730608188.

We look forward to seeing you this weekend.

 

2 Lower Body Strength Exercises for Young Athletes

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2 Lower Body Strength Exercises for Young Athletes

We’ve been working hard with lots of junior athletes on the Elite Performance Pathway this year and I’ve been reflecting on things I’ve done this year that have been particularly effective with the age group when it comes to improving strength.

Enhancing the force producing capabilities of our young athletes is a big priority in the Athletic Foundation (Year 7 & 8) phase of our LTAD system. Below are two exercises that are becoming common place in this phase as the athletes learn to train to get stronger:

The Bottom Up Split Squat

Bottom Up Split Squat

In my experience lots of young athletes struggle to get in to and maintain the correct start position when learning the Split Squat, even under just their own body weight due to various issues including poor stability. I’ve found that starting them in the bottom position of the split squat and making them work up from there a more effective way of teaching them this particular exercise.

Starting in the bottom position allows you to establish a solid, stable base before they lift themselves up to initiate the movement. It’s much easier for them to adjust their foot position whilst in the kneeling lunge position, as they won’t lose their balance.

I’ve also been getting them to execute it with their arms overhead, which fixes the common problem of the torso falling forward. As they get stronger you can provide some additional resistance from a medicine ball in the overhead position or at chest height.

The Kettlebell Deadlift

kettlebell-deadlift-from-the-floor-dieselsc-com

At the minute this is probably my favourite exercise to introduce to young athletes to lower body strength training after they’ve done some body weight squatting. It strengthens the posterior chain and is great to teach them how to get into and hold an extended spine position, which is particularly useful for those athletes that ‘fold’ over when performing any kind of body weight squat.

They can also start to get stronger in this lift even with a limited ROM in their squat, and means we can start to safely enhance their lower body force producing capabilities at the same time as addressing problem areas in their flexibility and mobility.

For those struggling to learn the movement, or struggling to get into the correct start position. I’ve been raising the Kettlebell on a 15 or 20kg bumper plate to make sure they are starting with the spine in a neutral position. Alternatively, starting from standing at the top of the lift (opposite to the Bottom up Split Squat) and working down to where they are able to maintain the neutral trunk position, gradually increasing depth over reps/sets/sessions as improve ROM becomes available.

Progressions

Both exercises set us up nicely to introduce more advanced variations of the exercises in subsequent blocks/phases of training as the movement pattern is already in place with the athlete. Example exercise progressions for each exercise are:

Bottom Up Split Squat -> MB Split Squat -> DB Split Squat -> Barbell Split Squat

Kettlbell Deadlift -> Kettlebell Swing -> Trap Bar Deadlift -> Traditional Deadlift

If you are interested in learning more about best practises to develop strength, power, speed and agility for athletes across the developmental continuum, join us for #ChildToChampion in Gloucester in April.