Resistance Training Matrix

Proformance Movement Matrix

Resistance Training Matrix

This resistance training movement matrix is designed to provide a progressive pathway of exercises for athletes young and old to develop their strength and power.

The prescription of sets, reps and loads is going to be dictated by the athletes biological age, training age and the objectives you are working towards and I would recommend working within the framework outlined in the UKSCA’s Youth Resistance Training Position Statement if you are working with athletes under the age of 18.

How they progress within each category will vary and they maybe operating at Level 5 in one category and Level 3 in another. Progression to the next level for me will be determined by technical competency in the previous level and completing a 3 week progression  of 8, 10 and 12 reps against bodyweight. Once an athlete can complete 3 sets of 12 reps with good technique I will move them up to the next level. After they have progressed through this I will then look at adding additional load.

It is worth noting that resistance training exercises should be included as part of a well rounded programme that also focuses on the development of flexibility, mobility, speed, agility and reactive strength (stretch shortening cycle) qualities.

Credits

The content of the movement matrix certainly isn’t original has been inspired by a number of sources and my own experience developing athletes of all ages. The broad categories are based upon those outlined in Rhodri Lloyd’s recent textbook Strength and Conditioning for Young Athletes for developing fundamental movement skills. Some of the exercise progressions particularly the single leg exercises have been strongly influenced by the work of Mike Boyle, and other coaches I have had the pleasure of talking to and working with such as Ed Archer and Rich Clarke of the Athlete Academy and Henry Davies at Cheltenham College. Credit must also go to John Noonan who introduced the concept of a movement matrix during his presentation at the UKSCA Annual Conference 2014.

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