Child To Champion 2016 Online Videos

Back in April we ran the incredibly successful Child To Champion 2016 LTAD Conference which brought together some real leaders in the field of S&C to discuss all things related to the topic of Long Term Athlete Development. Speakers across the weekend presented their work from various stages of the developmental continuum right from primary & secondary schools through to professional academies and elite international sport.

Now you can catch up on a fantastic set of lectures from the conference from Mike Young (Athletic Lab/Proformance), Simon Brundish (UK Strength Lab), Tom Rusga (EIS), Kevin Paxton (Leicester City FC), Shayne Murphy (Manchester City FC), James Baker (St. Peter’s High School/Proformance) and Neill Potts (Scottish Rugby Union).

The video series is now available to purchase online here: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/childtochampion2016

Below you can check out the trailer and what a few attendees had to say about the conference:

“Huge thanks to the Proformance team for collaborating leaders within long term athlete development. Child To Champion 2016 was exceptional CPD” – Tulshi Varsani

“Child To Champion 2016 conference did not disappoint! One of the best CPD events yet!” – Mark Read, Academy Conditioning Coach. Malmo FF, Sweden.

“Amazing weekend at the Child To Champion 2o16 Conference, lots of exciting stuff to put into play. Time to start the revolution” Ben Weaver.

Child To Champion 2016: LTAD Conference from Proformance Network on Vimeo.

We are busy working on pulling together the conference for 2017 be sure to keep an eye out for details of the conference in the coming months.

Historic Performance Podcast #62 – James Baker

This past week Proformance S&C’s James Baker was interviewed on the Historic Performance Podcast with James Darley about his work in Youth Athletic Development at St. Peter’s R.C. High School in Gloucester, England.

At the school he has created and integrated a long term athlete development system – the Elite Performance Pathway (EPP) – into the state school Physical Education curriculum.

The EPP is a unique program that has re-defined what can be offered by state secondary schools. Athletes are provided with high quality strength and conditioning, hands-on nutrition lessons, applied psychological preparation workshops, lifestyle and injury management.

In this episode, James talks about the EPP philosophy, performance testing for development stage athletes ranging from 14 to 16 years of age, and annual strength & conditioning planning.

Overview of Podcast Episode

Here is a brief outline of what they covered in the show –

  • James’s Background + S&C Journey
  • Creating the EPP program at St. Peter’s R.C. High School
  • The EPP Philosophy
  • Annual planning and structure for development athletes (14-16 years)
  • Performance testing & evolution of the process
  • Data collection to validate programs
  • Future of PE in England
  • Recommendations of PE Teachers + S&C coaches wanting to work with high school athletes
  • How to contact?

You can listen to the full episode of the podcast here and if you have an interest in learning more about training young athletes you may also want to check out the online video series from the 2016 Child To Champion LTAD Conference.

 

 

PUSH Band - Velocity Based Training Device

Train with PUSH in the UK

Train with PUSH in the UK

We are excited to be able to confirm our partnership working with PUSH to supply their velocity based training device, the Push Band, in the UK as part of a new consultation service launching in the coming weeks providing tailor-made solutions for individuals, teams, universities and private facilities looking to maximise their athletes’ strength, power and speed potential using some of the latest technology including the Push Band.

The service will ensure that you get the most out of products such as the Push Band as soon as you receive them by helping you to understand how the products work best and ensuring you achieve a seamless integration of the products to your training environment to maximise adherence and return on your investment.

Full details of the services and products will be available on the Proformance S&C website soon. 

If you are based in North America and want to learn more about Velocity Based Training, PUSH are running The High Powered Performance Tour with Dr. Dan Baker across four locations, click the links below or the image for more information:

10th July: Athletic Lab, Cary, NC home of Proformance’s Dr. Mike Young

15th July: North Eastern University, Boston, MA

17th July: North Western University, Chicago, IL

23rd July: Texas A&M, College Station, TX

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S&C Internship – EPP @ St. Peter’s High School

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Strength and Conditioning Internship – EPP St. Peter’s R.C. High School

Role Description

Purpose: To support the strength and Conditioning coach and other members of the sports department with the delivery of the Elite Performance Pathway, a school based Long Term Athlete Development programme at St. Peter’s R.C. High School and Sixth Form Centre in Gloucester.

This is voluntary unpaid position

Responsible to: James Baker – Strength and Conditioning / Stuart Crabb – Head of PE

Duration: Until the end of the 2016-2017 academic year

The internship will provide you with:

  • Hands on coaching experience operating within S&C in a multisport environment
  • Knowledge within S&C principles to assist in obtaining a job
  • CPD including in-house workshops and networking opportunities.
  • Mentorship through UKSCA accreditation
  • Experience/knowledge of how to implement S&C in a school setting
  • Opportunity for research for dissertation/thesis.

General Responsibilities:

    • Improve athletic performance through the programming and delivery of athletic development sessions.
    • Test, monitor and review of pupils competing in a variety of sports during in season
    • Assist in the design and delivery of year round training programmes for individual athletes
    • Undertake a variety of projects including research to maintain consistent progression throughout the internship.
    • Assist in the delivery of S&C sessions during school hours and after school sessions for athletes across different sports with a view to eventually leading your own sessions.
    • Promote the safeguarding and welfare of children with whom you come into contact.
    • Maintain regular consistent and professional attendance, punctuality, personal appearance, and adherence to relevant Health & Safety procedures.
    • Pursue personal development of skills and knowledge necessary for the effective performance of the role.
    • Develop and maintain a good working relationship with the staff, pupils and other guests.
    • Carry out any other duties which may reasonably be requested of you by the Head of PE.

The ideal candidate will possess:

      • Coaching experience preferably within S&C and/or with youth athletes
      • Graduate qualifications in Sports Science, Strength and Conditioning (or working towards these) and/or REPS Level 3 Personal Training Qualifications.
      • Good knowledge of S&C principles including speed/agility/Olympic lifting
      • Comfortable in a team sport environment, controlling and disciplining large groups.
      • Excellent ability to communicate with, and develop, young people
      • Willingness to learn and develop as an S&C coach
      • Desire to complete UKSCA accreditation
      • Computer literacy, including MS office, especially Excel

DUE TO THE AGE GROUPS YOU WILL WORK WITH, YOU MUST HAVE/OBTAIN A DBS CERTIFICATE & COMPLETE THE SCHOOL SAFEGUARDING TRAINING IN ORDER TO BE APPOINTED IN THE POST.

To apply: Please download the application form: S&C Internship Application Form and send it with a covering letter explaining why you think you are suitable for the post to James Baker on – jbaker@sphs.uk.com

Start date: September 2016 (some CPD sessions in July 2016, if you are available)

Closing date for applications: 30th June 2016

Interviews: 4th July 2016

#ChildToChampion LTAD Conference 2016 Highlights

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#ChildToChampion LTAD Conference 2016 Highlights

Just under a month ago we were joined from coaches from across the UK and Europe for the Child To Champion LTAD Conference at St. Peter’s R.C. High School in Gloucester.

The weekend was a fantastic learning experience providing an opportunity to learn, share and connect with leaders from the field of strength & conditioning working at all levels of the athletic development continuum.

The video below provides a superb snapshot in to the weekend and the mixture of theoretical and practical sessions that took place.

A huge thanks must go to everyone who took the time out of their busy schedules to attend the event, the phenomenal speakers and our sponsors Exxentric, Nutrition-X and Perform Better who all played their part in making it a huge success.

You’ll be pleased to know we are already in the planning process for Child To Champion 2017 but in the mean time, if you missed this years event, you can now catch up through the online video series available through our On Demand Service. Check out the highlights reel below.

Child To Champion 2016: LTAD Conference from Proformance Network on Vimeo.

Podcast with #HPAD16 Presenter – Ryan Horn

Podcast with #HPAD16 Presenter – Ryan Horn

We are really excited to have Ryan Horn joining us to present at the High Performance Athletic Development Clinic at Athletic Lab on the 28-29th May 2016.

Ryan is presenting on “Implementing Technology in Sport” sharing his experiences using technology over at Wake Forest University providing a detailed insight for attendees to be able to take away and improve their use of technology in their own coaching environment.

This great episode of the CVASP Podcast is a superb insight to what you can expect from his presentation at #HPAD16 where he will also be joined by a whole lineup of top coaches including Boo Schexnayder.

If you want to see Ryan and the other top coaches presenting live out at Athletic Lab you can check out the full schedule here or take advantage of one of the remaining Early Bird Tickets by booking up below.

High Performance Athletic Development Clinic – Updated Schedule

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US High Performance Athletic Development Clinic @ Athletic Lab

Here at Proformance S&C we are committed to providing world class education giving you opportunities to learn, share and connect with leaders in the field of strength and conditioning to help you further your career.

After the phenomenal learning experience last weekend at ‪#‎ChildToChampion‬ in the UK. We are stepping up preparations for the next Proformance S&C Network event the High Performance Athletic Development Clinic out at Athletic Lab in Cary, NC, USA on the 28th & 29th May 2016.

We are extremely excited to be able to confirm the full list of presentations from the main presenters, with our “Future Leaders” programme presenters to be added shortly.

You can grab an early bird ticket here: http://www.proformance.pro/high-performance-athletic-devel…/

Day 1

8:00 Registration & Continental Breakfast sponsored by Hammer Strength
8:30-9:45 Boo Schexnayder: Critical Factors in Speed Training Design
9:45-10:45 Greg Gatz: Off Season Training is Really In-Season Part 2
10:45-11:15 Nick Newman (Athletic Lab): Assisted Jump Training
11:15-12:30 Mike Young: Neuromechanics of Speed Development
12:30-1:00 Chad Workman (UNC) Simple strategies for delivering a holistic program in the collegiate setting
1:00-1:45 Catered Lunch sponsored by EXCEL Training Designs
1:45-3:00 Boo Schexnayder: Advanced Uses of Circuit Training
3:00-4:00 Ryan Horn: Implementing Technology in Sport
4:00-5:00 Nate Brookreson: Monitoring Training for Team Sports
5:00-6:15 Boo Schexnayder: Compatible & Complimentary Training Design

Day 2

8:00 Continental Breakfast sponsored by Hammer Strength
8:30-9:45 Boo Schexnayder (SAC Speed): Plyometric Classification and Periodization
9:45-10:45 Bob Alejo (NCSU): Basics of Strength Training
10:45-11:45 Boo Schexnayder (SAC Speed): Teaching Schemes for Acceleration and Maximal Velocity Mechanics
11:45-12:15 John Grace (Athletic Lab): Monitoring on a Budget
12:15-1:15 Catered Lunch sponsored by Connor Sports
1:15-2:30 Boo Schexnayder (SAC Speed): Strength Training Periodization for Speed and Power Sports
2:30-3:00 Future Leaders- Steve Scruggs (USC) Eyes on the Stove | Managing the “Flame” of Speed and Strength Development
3:00-4:00 Mike Young (Athletic Lab): Developing Physical Capacities for Speed & Power

Partner Hotels: 

Don’t miss this incredible CPD opportunity sign up now and grab a ticket whilst they last at the early bird rate…

Here’s what some of our attendees at the last Proformance S&C event had to say about their experiences:

 

LIMITED EARLY BIRD TICKETS REMAINING BOOK NOW

Weights vs Skills Debate

Weights vs Skills Debate

In case you missed it the other evening on BT Sport’s Rugby Tonight Austin Healey set about putting the S&C industry back 20 years when he decided to proclaim a number of the old ‘myths’ about weight training and young athletes were true facts. Stating on national TV they shouldn’t be lifting weights before they are 17 and that it would damage them and stunt their growth! You can check the clip out on Twitter here. Since then the debate has raged on about whether young players should focus on weights or skills as a priority.

Now whilst the educated viewer will know research has shown that resistance training is both safe and beneficial for young athletes, the danger now is that less aware parents and their kids who would directly benefit from resistance training, may now be put off the idea of engaging in a structured S&C programme as a perceived Rugby expert and role model has made these statements (Healey being a former England International and British Lion).

It was interesting to see the reaction on social media with a strong S&C community on Twitter. There was a backlash with many coaches pointing him in the direction of the many documents of recent research, and many high profile coaches stepping forward to try and rectify his views, but he seems fairly set on his beliefs and is unwilling to be educated on the area. We have even extended and invitation to him for the Child To Champion conference early next month, but we’re yet to receive his RSVP…

After my initial outrage settled down, I started to consider his point of view and whilst completely misguided and ignorant in terms of the ‘facts’ he presenting regarding the safety of weight training, don’t shoot me, but I think in there somewhere there may actually be some good messages or reminders in there that we can take away.

Having worked with a lot of young rugby players over the last 8 years, I think I do understand where he is coming from. With older athletes in the 16-18 range, that haven’t come up through a structured LTAD system, I’ve had to do a lot of work to undo pre-conceived ideas about training that are heavily biased towards upper body pushing exercises and bicep curls, which Austin mentioned, in the pursuit of increased muscle mass. Many of them completely ignore glaringly obvious deficits in their technical-tactical skill set or other physical capacities (e.g. speed, agility, cardiovascular endurance).

However, rather than remove weights from their development our job as technical and/or S&C coaches is to educate them in how to train effectively, guide and motivate them towards further developing strengths and addressing their weaknesses wherever they lie.

Here are some key things I think we need to consider:

1) We must pursue balance and address the needs of the individual athlete

It is important to keep balance in our programmes and ensure the technical, tactical and mental aspects are developed as well as the physical elements. For me it isn’t an either/or situation for physical preparation and Rugby specific skill training, it is both. To get the balance right we must consider the individual needs of the athlete. I can think of some phenomenally skilful players at our school that lack the physical presence to dominate the contact situation. Likewise, I can think of some monster strong kids who can’t catch a cold and just run straight into contact. We aren’t going to train them the same way.

As athletic development coaches I think we can take some responsibility for helping to developing higher level manipulation skills by incorporating challenging tasks with smaller objects (e.g. tennis balls, golf balls) to warm ups or expose them to a completely different sport skills with some skills that could transfer to Rugby, in some of my sessions recently with I’ve done 5 minutes in a warm up dribbling and passing a basketball with both hands, which has been a big challenge for some players. The athletes were switched on, concentrating and engaged from the off and we had a great S&C session after.

2) Weight training is only ONE of many tools

Weight training is only one of many tools that should be in the S&C coaches tool box, and we must understand why we are using it with a specific athlete. For me it’s about producing more robust players, that can produce high levels of force relative to their body weight.

However, there is also a lot of training that can/should come before we begin traditional weight training with dumbbells and barbells. As well as a lot of different training that needs to be done to complement it (see point 3). With a lot of our young athletes on the Elite Performance Pathway we spend a considerable chunk of time up to 1-2 years developing strength and grooving the fundamental movement patterns against their bodyweight then low/soft load resistance (e.g. bands, powerbags) in a wide range of progressive movements across the squat/lunge/push/pull/hinge/brace categories before getting into any significantly loaded traditional weight training exercises.

3) Develop a broad range of sports generic movement skills

“Sport is movement, if we improve movement, we improve performance” Ian Jeffreys

In addition, to the basic movements, it is important that we teach/coach young athletes a broad range of sport generic movements through effective movement training in addition to resistance training so they can safely and effectively accelerate, decelerate, cut, spin, jump, land, leap, hop and throw at a range of speeds, in all planes of movement.

If we do a great job of developing these movement patterns in progressively challenging and specific situations (e.g. closed -> open -> reactive/CHAOS) as well as enhancing the force producing/reducing and energy system capacities of the athlete we can see significant improvements in a players ability to exploit and use space on the pitch, rather than taking route one into contact all the time.

Movement training in open & reactive scenarios for me is vitally important for several of reasons. First, it provides a highly engaging and challenging environment that young athletes really enjoy. Secondly, it allows us to develop the perceptual-cognitive component of agility by challenging decision making and familiarising the athlete with common movement patterns they may need to read quickly/anticipate in defence and execute swiftly in attack.

Certainly, the feedback we’ve had from our Rugby coaches at the school is that the boys who have been involved in this combined approach of strength development and movement training over the last couple of years have significantly improved their performance on the pitch.

In summary, I think it is vital we keep our eye on the big picture and not become to obsessed/biased towards any one type of training. In my opinion we need to be developing players who can efficiently and effectively produce high levels of force using appropriate means for their stage of development, and then ensuring they are capable of utilising it in a broad range of movement patterns at varying speed. Crucially this shouldn’t be developed at the expense of technical and tactical skills rather a solid working relationship with open communication channels should be established between the Rugby coach and the S&C/Athletic Development coach to ensure a rounded development of the individual player into a highly skilled and physical, elusive runner.

If you are interested in learning more about Long Term Athlete Development you can join a host of practitioners from across the developmental continuum at Child To Champion on April 9th & 10th 2016 in Gloucester.

Hip Hinge Teaching Progressions

Hip Hinge Teaching Progressions

Over the last few months I’ve been working with two new groups of athletes within the Elite Performance Pathway at St. Peter’s R.C. High School.

The athletes are all 11-12 years old and there are 15 athletes in one group and 19 in the other which presents logistical challenges when trying to coach and teach them all new movements.

Over the first two half terms we focused on developing Squat, Lunge, Push, Pull and Brace movements and recently we began learning the Hinge.

The first couple of lessons were pretty unproductive with the athletes really struggling to grasp the movement and with such high numbers in the group and only me in there to make adjustments I decided to start playing with some different progressions using an external constraint in the form of a resistance band to help the get a feel for the correct movement.

Having now completed a few sessions using the bands the athletes have progressed much further in terms of nailing this movement down. We’ve also added in a wooden broomstick held across the shoulders (back squat position) to reinforce a retracted shoulder position throughout the hinge.

If you are interested in joining in with more discussions around LTAD check out the upcoming Child To Champion conference.

 

 

Mike Young #ChildToChampion Podcast

Mike Young #ChildToChampion Podcast

Yesterday I had the pleasure of chatting to Mike about his upcoming presentations at the Child To Champion conference on VBT, Best Practises for Speed Development across the Developmental Continuum and Advanced Strategies for Elite Strength & Power Development.

We recorded the chat so you can hear what you’ve got to look forward to seeing if you are attending the conference. There’s a bit of an echo on sound as we didn’t have the best connection via Skype last night, but hopefully you can enjoy it all the same.

If you haven’t signed up yet but want to see Mike deliver these talks live we still have a limited number of tickets available for you to attend the conference. Including just 2 at the discounted Early Bird rate which you can purchase below.