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2015 “Meeting of the Minds” Conference

2015 conf-1

2015 “Meeting of the Minds” Conference

In case you’ve not seen this yet I wanted to share it with you, I’ve just booked up to this online conference being run by Brendan Chaplin and his team of coaches.

I am sure you are as excited as me when you see the list of the people you could be learning from in what is quite possibly the year’s best conference line up….

Here are the twelve master coaches, set to hit your computer screens in March 2015!

MIKE BOYLE
The guest of honour: one of the world’s foremost experts in Strength and Conditioning

NICK WINKELMAN
Director of Education for EXOS

MLADEN JOVANOVIC
One of the world-leading experts in GPS and performance monitoring

IAN PYPER
World-class strength and conditioning coach to Olympic athletes

BILL SANDS
Women’s Head Coach at USA Gymnastics World (previous National Director of Education for the National Strength and Conditioning Association, Colorado Springs)

BEN ROSENBLATT
Senior strength and conditioning coach with the English Institute of Sport and coach with the England Hockey Programme at Bishop Abbey

JAMES CLEAN

Writer, athlete and coach (played in All-America baseball team)

DAVID JOYCE

Head of Athletic Performance at the Greater Western Sydney Giants in the Australian Football League

JIM KIELBASO
Former college strength and conditioning coach (former director of the Total Performance Training Centres in Michigan)

STUART YULE
Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at Glasgow Warriors.

RON MCKEEFERY
Nationally recognised leader in the area of sports development (awarded “Under Armor Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year” by the Professional Football Strength and Conditioning Society)

I’m sure you will agree this is a phenomenal line up and even better for a busy coach is the fact you don’t have to find time or have the expense of travelling across the country to see them.

Included in the package are recordings of all the conference presentations which means you’ll be refer back to them at a later date!

>>BOOK NOW<<

Speed Training – Elite Performance Pathway

Speed Training

Training to enhance speed has become something of an obsession for me as a coach over the last few years. When I was reviewing my progress as a coach back in 2010 and looking around at the competition I highlighted speed & agility training as a weaker area of my skill set but an opportunity for me to grow and stand out from the crowd of coaches who rarely stray away from a weights room with their clients/athletes.

I’ve gone on to read tons of books and articles, studied videos, been to conferences and on courses in pursuit of understanding what it takes to make my athletes faster.

But most importantly I’ve then committed hours and hours applying this knowledge and I am know implementing it in to a much more comprehensive system.

If you are a strength coach who isn’t confident with speed work I encourage you to take yourself out of your comfort zone and start exposing your athletes and clients to this type of training. The results can be phenomenal.

Speed Training & the Elite Performance Pathway

Speed training is an integral part of what we deliver on our EPP programme with the young athletes. We focus on coaching the correct positions and movement patterns whilst developing the strength and power qualities required to optimise acceleration and maximal velocity sprinting.

Over the last 4 weeks we’ve utilised a training system that has incorporated the following components during each session that lasts approximately 90 minutes, once a week.

  1. Foam rolling
  2. Activation (glutes, hip flexors, core, shoulder stabilisers)
  3. Movement prep (6 full body movements)
  4. Jump Training – Jump, Leap & Hop (Linear major emphasis, Lateral minor emphasis)
  5. Wall drills
  6. Marching – Skipping – Bounding
  7. Free Sprinting
  8. Strength Training – key exercises – Bilateral Lower Body, Upper body Push, Unilateral Lower Body, Upper Body Pull, Core (anti-rotation / bracing)
  9. Flexibility

The stucture of the training system has been heavily influenced by the work of Lee Taft, Mike Boyle, Nick Winkelman and Team EXOS in terms of what it contains. The biggest shift in the delivery though is HOW I am coaching within speed training sessions, moving from internal coaching cues focused on the body position, to external cues focused on outcomes, which is down to what I have seen and heard Lee Taft and Nick Winkelman talk about and deliver. I urge all coaches to check out their work!

The results

What we’ve seen in the first 4 weeks of using the speed training system is quite staggering, all the results are electronically timed using a Microgate Witty Timing System so there are no dodgy stopwatch results in the mix. I don’t need to say anything else as the results speak for themselves…

EPP KS4 Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10m Sprint Times Oct 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Are you an athlete that needs to get faster? Are you a coach that wants to learn how to make athletes faster? Over the next few months we will be announcing an exciting line up of workshops and seminars that will help you take your athletic performance or coaching  to the next level, by giving you the opportunity to learn tried and trusted methods with some of the leading strength and conditioning coaches from around the UK. If you are committed to becoming the best coach or athlete you can be, pre-register your interest in these courses to make sure you get a place – CONTACT US NOW!

Resistance Training Matrix

Proformance Movement Matrix

Resistance Training Matrix

This resistance training movement matrix is designed to provide a progressive pathway of exercises for athletes young and old to develop their strength and power.

The prescription of sets, reps and loads is going to be dictated by the athletes biological age, training age and the objectives you are working towards and I would recommend working within the framework outlined in the UKSCA’s Youth Resistance Training Position Statement if you are working with athletes under the age of 18.

How they progress within each category will vary and they maybe operating at Level 5 in one category and Level 3 in another. Progression to the next level for me will be determined by technical competency in the previous level and completing a 3 week progression  of 8, 10 and 12 reps against bodyweight. Once an athlete can complete 3 sets of 12 reps with good technique I will move them up to the next level. After they have progressed through this I will then look at adding additional load.

It is worth noting that resistance training exercises should be included as part of a well rounded programme that also focuses on the development of flexibility, mobility, speed, agility and reactive strength (stretch shortening cycle) qualities.

Credits

The content of the movement matrix certainly isn’t original has been inspired by a number of sources and my own experience developing athletes of all ages. The broad categories are based upon those outlined in Rhodri Lloyd’s recent textbook Strength and Conditioning for Young Athletes for developing fundamental movement skills. Some of the exercise progressions particularly the single leg exercises have been strongly influenced by the work of Mike Boyle, and other coaches I have had the pleasure of talking to and working with such as Ed Archer and Rich Clarke of the Athlete Academy and Henry Davies at Cheltenham College. Credit must also go to John Noonan who introduced the concept of a movement matrix during his presentation at the UKSCA Annual Conference 2014.